Granite Composite Sink
Buyer's Guide

Granite composite sinks are made by mixing fine granite sand with an acrylic resin bonding agent. Most manufacturers use a mix of 80% granite particles and 20% bonding agent.

This process produces a material that has many of the same qualities of granite but is more durable, easier to maintain, and less expensive.

Blanco granite composite kitchen sink
Blanco 519450 Precis Cascade in Anthracite

Some kitchen sink manufacturers produce granite composite sinks under trade names like Blanco’s Silgranit or Franke’s Fragranite.

Granite is the most common materials used in composite sinks, although you will also find composite sinks made from quartz. This article focuses on granite sinks, but much of the information applies to quartz sinks as well.

Appearance of Granite Composite Sinks

Unlike natural granite, granite composite sinks have a very uniform color but still retain much of the charm of natural granite.

As you can see in the examples below, granite composite sinks have a beautiful “sandy” look that works well with many decors. Most composite sinks will have a lightly textured matte finish.

Granite composite close up collage

Manufacturers have much greater control over the color and consistency of granite composite sinks, so they can offer a wide range of options. For example, Blanco’s Silgranit sinks are currently offered in a eight unique color choices:

Blanco Silgranit granite composite color samples
Blanco Silgranit color samples

You can play around more with Blanco’s composite sink colors using their exclusive design tool.

Granite Composite Durability

Granite composite sinks are incredibly tough and offer excellent resistance to scratching, scuffing, and impacts. The uniformity of the material also means it won’t chip like real stone.

Blanco Precis single bowl granite composite sink
Blanco Precis Super Single Bowl in Anthracite

Granite composite has excellent heat resistance. Most manufacturers rate their granite composite sinks to just over 530 °F (about 276 °C).

Small chips and cracks may occur from heavy impacts, but they can be repaired with an epoxy filler tinted to match the sink.

Granite composite is a very tough material, but it still might be worth investing in a stainless steel bottom grid for extra protection.

Maintenance and Cleaning Granite Composite Sinks

Unlike solid granite, granite composite is nonporous, making it easier to clean and maintain.

Most stains and messes should can be cleaned using gentle cleaners and soft scouring pads or microfiber cloths. Don’t use steel wool and wire brushes.

Elkay quartz composite sink
Elkay Quartz Luxe in Charcoal

Bar Keeper’s Friend and Soft Scrub are recommended by several manufacturers as strong but safe cleaners for granite composite sinks.

Wiping the sink dry after every use will help avoid stains or mineral buildup.

Many granite composite sinks will also benefit from an occasional application of mineral oil. This is especially helpful with darker color sinks when it comes to maintaining deep blacks and browns.

While composite sink maintenance is fairly straightforward, some cleaners can mar the surface of granite composite sinks. Always be sure to carefully read the manufacturer’s care and cleaning instructions that are included with your sink.

Cost of Granite Composite Sinks

Most granite composite sinks will range in price from $200 to $400. This is relatively affordable compared to other premium sinks options like cast iron or fireclay.

Of course, cost can vary greatly depending on size, mounting style, and basin configuration. Undermount and apron front (farmhouse) sinks will tend to be more expensive.

KitchenRemodelGuides.com has an excellent article on composite sink prices.

Noise

The thickness and density of most granite composite sinks mean they have natural sound-absorbing properties and are very quiet.

Since they are not made of a singular material, composite sinks have the look of luxury materials without the full cost that would accompany a fixture constructed entirely from luxe materials.

Installation

There’s nothing unusually difficult about installing a granite composite sink, but you should keep in mind that they’re a lot heavier than stainless steel and may require additional structural support below your counter.

If you’re not sure if your counter can handle the additional weight of a composite sink, it’s best to hire an experienced contractor for the job.


Pros

  • Relatively affordable
  • Non-porous and durable
  • Low noise
  • Heat resistant

Cons

  • Heavy
  • Higher maintenance than stainless steel
  • More prone to mineral buildup


Ideas & Inspiration

Below you’ll find a gallery of granite composite kitchen sinks. Clicking any image will take you Amazon, where you’ll find more information about specs and pricing.

Blanco 441611 Valea Super Single Bowl in Cinder
MR Direct 848 TruGranite Black
Winpro New Black Granite Quartz Composite
Blanco 440177 Silgranit in Cafe Brown
Kraus KGD-412B
Franke DIG61091-GRA in Graphite
Franke DIG62D91-GRA Primo in Graphite
Elkay Quartz Luxe in Charcoal
Blanco Precis Super Single Bowl in Anthracite
Blanco Modex Kitchen Sink
Blanco Silgranit Double Bowl
Blanco 519450 Precis Cascade in Anthracite